More on the Reality of Living with Wind and Solar Energy

A while ago, I discussed that the future has arrived, and that we can see the real cost of ‘green’ energy policies in the case of Germany. If you are a business owner, or just and ordinary electricity bill payer, you should read the earlier post. The sudden retreat in Germany from nuclear power has left the country reliant on renewables, and energy shortages, energy unreliability and skyrocketing energy costs are the result. Just to serve to emphasise the point, Spiegel online has yet another news story that tells of the many problems being experienced in Germany. All the ingredients I long ago discussed are there.

  • Problems concerned with the intermittent power provision
  • High costs associated with connecting renewables to the grid
  • High costs associated with storage of energy
  • Hight costs associated with keeping backup online from conventional sources for when the wind does not blow / sun does not shine, including inefficient use of conventional capacity
  • High costs of investment from the necessity to build conventional plant backup for each renewable sources (capital expenditure)
  • Rationing of power, in this case, having large business energy users being paid to shut down their factories – paid to produce nothing

I may have missed a couple of points, but I am sure you get the picture. The consequences of renewable energy in Germany are now not the bright hypothetical future painted by ‘green’ propoganda, but are now very real and dismal. I have long admired Germany as an industrial power, but even Germany cannot be immune from the consequences of their mad ‘green’ energy policy. If the quotes I give below later are not enough, read the whole article. It is very clear and very simple to see the consequences of moving to ‘green’ energy.

Countries that follow a green energy agenda are putting an economic gun to their own heads, and pulling the trigger. In the case of Germany, the abandonment of nuclear has made the future now. We have yet to see the full consequences of energy based upon renewables; they will be seen in the next few years, but right now, the situation for energy provision is already dire. It is already very, very bad. It is a disaster, and even the ‘green’ Germans are starting to choke on the consequences. I will now quote at length from sections of the Spiegel article and let the quotes speak for themselves.

With the government driving up the price of electricity, Rösler seems to feel an urge to make himself useful by dispensing advice on how to save money and energy. On Monday, grid operators announced a significant increase in electricity prices in Germany, prices that are already the second-highest in Europe.

The price hike is the result of an assessment under the Renewable Energy Act (EEG), a sort of green-energy solidarity surcharge that is automatically added to every consumer’s electricity bill. Under the agreement reached in the last round of negotiations, the assessment will increase from 3.6 cents to 5.4 cents per kilowatt hour.

With the new rates, German citizens will be paying a total of more than €20 billion ($25.7 billion) next year to promote renewable energy. This is more than €175 for an average three-person household, a 50 percent increase over current figures. And then there are the additional charges a consumer pays for the electricity tax, the cogeneration assessment, the concession fee and value-added tax.

[and]

The rising cost of electricity is also a burden on businesses. According to Oettinger, energy costs now represent the biggest liability for Germany as a place to do business, especially in light of the marked increase in the number of blackouts and voltage fluctuations in the grid.

Consumer advocates view the electricity price as a social issue, not unlike the price of bread in ancient Rome. The Paritätischer Gesamtverband, an umbrella association for social-welfare groups, estimates that about 200,000 recipients of benefits under the Hartz IV welfare reform program for the long-term unemployed saw their power shut off last year because of unpaid bills. The VdK, Germany’s largest welfare organization, uses the term “electricity poverty” and is sharply critical of what it sees as a “glaring violation of basic social rights.” According to the VdK, it is unfair that citizens are being asked to bear much of the burden of costs and risks associated with the energy turnaround.

[and]

Unfortunately, the electricity is not needed as urgently along the thinly populated coast, but rather in the distant southern states of Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. The two states have large populations and industry, as well as a number of nuclear power plants scheduled to be shut down soon. For this reason, the federal government’s decision to expedite the expansion of offshore wind power means that new power lines will have to be built, at a cost of €20 billion to €37 billion — the most expensive infrastructure project since German reunification.

[and]

Franken is part of the so-called cold reserve of the German energy supply. As long as there isn’t enough storage capacity, virtually every solar plant and every wind turbine has to be backed up by a conventional power plant. Without this double structure, the power supply would collapse.

At the same time, however, the boom in subsidized renewable energy is ensuring that conventional power plants are no longer profitable. Since the law requires that preference be given to green energy, if it’s available, gas-, oil- and coal-fired power plants frequently have to be shut down to avoid overloading the grid. This reduces their revenues while increasing costs because powering plants up and down consumes a lot of fuel and inflicts additional wear and tear on the equipment.

In the past, power plant operators were able to charge higher electricity prices around midday. But now there is more competition from solar plants at this time of day. On days when there is a lot of wind, the sun is shining and consumption is low, market prices on the power exchange can sometimes drop to zero. There is even such a thing as negative costs, when, for example, Austrian pumped-storage hydroelectric plants are paid to take the excess electricity from Germany.

The prospects are so poor that energy providers have little interest in building new power plants. Under current conditions, even the most modern and efficient combined steam and gas power plants are not recovering billions in investment costs.

[and]

With extremely cold temperatures gripping large parts of Europe, there was a spike in power consumption. Hamburg was on the verge of a blackout, says plant manager Lutz Bandusch. To keep the lights from going out in the city, he shut down the blast furnaces and rolling mills in Finkenwerder.

Instead of making money by producing steel, the plant operator was compensated for not producing it. It was a profitable arrangement for the steel mill. “It has to be worthwhile from an economic standpoint,” Bandusch admits, even though he felt that it was somewhat odd to be getting paid to do nothing.

[and]

Batteries are also part of the government’s plans, and €400 million in public funds have already been earmarked for related R&D. The industry also has high hopes for battery technology. But it this realistic?

For the fun of it, Florian Schlögl, director of the regenerative power plant department at the Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology (IWES) in the central German city of Kassel, calculated how large a battery would have to be to supply a city like Munich (pop. 1.38 million) with electricity for two or three days.

The answer, says Schlögl, depends on which battery technology is available. A cube-shaped lithium ion battery, such as the ones used in cell phones and laptops, would be 53 meters (174 feet) long on each edge. This would make it as tall as the roof of the Allianz Arena, where FC Bayern Munich plays its home games, and it would weight 250,000 metric tons. The dimensions would be even larger in the case of a lead acid battery, such as those used in cars. A cube-shaped battery would be 93.3 meter long on each edge — and Munich would have a new signature landmark.

[and]

In the next few years, electricity consumers will pay for more than €100 billion in subsidies for solar power. Additional billions will follow. Like its predecessor, the current CDU/CSU-FDP government has also bowed to the solar lobby. The latter’s business model is still based on collecting as many subsidies as possible rather than on feeding as much usable electricity as possible into the grid.

This is not the future. It is the ‘now‘ in Germany. It is the future being embraced by most of the major political parties in New Zealand. They are embracing economic decline, and telling you the future is bright. It is not bright, but a future of darkness in which the lights go out, and you pay ever more for an ever less reliable energy system. It is job losses, a lower standard of living, and energy poverty. It is time to wake up. We can now see the future. When you hear ‘green’ platitudes and arguments, point their attention to Germany. When you hear a politician wittering about the benefits of going ‘green’ point the politician’s attention to Germany. When you hear the ‘green’ platitudes and arguments for the wonders of renewables, paint the picture with the now of Germany.

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11 responses to “More on the Reality of Living with Wind and Solar Energy

  1. Here is a video in German about the large size of new turbines over there (160m)

    http://www.3sat.de/mediathek/?display=1&mode=play&obj=27847

    The video is worth watching just for the eye-watering images of massive turbines right next to people’s houses.

  2. Solar and wind energy really give an head ache because it was really expensive however it is a great way for a clean energy which our planet need,in Finland country most of the people start using own solar panel and wind turbine even though everything is in a high cost.

    • Hi Eeva, I do not worry about people buying their own turbines/solar, if they are willing to bear the cost themselves (although if too many did it, there are risks to grid stability, which I cannot explain here in a brief response). I think that is what you are describing? It is the imposition of the additional costs on others that I do not think is acceptable.

  3. This how NZ has conned the public into the Turitea wind farm. It is an absolute disgrace.
    http://turiteadocuments.wordpress.com/
    http://nzwindfarms.wordpress.com/

    • The most interesting point in the article is that they are claiming that wind energy is competitive, but the reality comes in this part:

      His comments were echoed by Sven Teske, Greenpeace’s senior energy expert, who argued that “the most important ingredient for the long term success of the wind industry is stable, long term policy, sending a clear signal to investors about the government’s vision for the scope and potential for the technology”.

      By ‘vision’, they mean ongoing direct and indirect subsidies. After all, if wind energy were competitive in its own right, there would be no need for ‘vision’ as the case would speak for itself.

  4. This is an interesting article from the Spiegel on Germany’s experience with wind and solar.

    Not that Poland is installing equipment to prevent surges from the German grid
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/german-energy-expert-argues-against-subsidies-for-solar-power-a-866996.html

  5. This is a pretty shocking story

    http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/8766481/the-great-british-wind-scam/

    The big turbines are being throttled back to produce less electricity so they get more subsidies. Turbine manufacturers even cater for this segment of the UK market.

    • Thanks for the link. I just took a look at the article. Madness. But then it is just a new spin on what is in all cases the complete madness of wind energy.

  6. Pingback: More on the Cost of Renewables from Germany | New Zealand Climate Change

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